Does Exercise Impact Hair Loss And Regrowth? Is Nitric Oxide a helpful supplement for both hair loss and exercise?

Bodybuilding-HairlossAt HairSecrets, we often receive questions from those suffering from hair loss (both early and late stage) regarding exercise, and its effects on hair loss and hair regrowth.

Exercise can impact androgenic hair loss by affecting hormone levels, including DHT and estrogen. The quantification of androgen responses to exercise can be classified in four combined categories: short versus long term, and anaerobic versus aerobic.

In cross-sectional analyses, aerobic exercisers have lower basal total and free testosterone compared to the sedentary. Anaerobic exercisers also have lower testosterone compared to the sedentary. Testosterone acutely increases, briefly, when comparing aerobic, anaerobic, and mixed forms of exercise.

Question

The following are selected questions from a reader of the Ultimate Hair Secrets eBook, along with answers provided to assist in his particular exercise routine, which consisted of training for boxing–a hard hitting workout, but with aerobic properties–and a question regarding the addition of Nitric Oxide, a popular workout supplement, to his supplement regime.  Body building products marketed as Nitric Oxide are actually often Arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) – a salt of the amino acid arginine and alpha-ketoglutaric acid, or simply L-Arginine. Its components are intermediates in the metabolism of nitric oxides.  A particularly popular (and time-released) version of this product is available in the BSN Nitrix A.M. to P.M. Vaso-Muscular Volumizer, which provides increased strength and “pump” during a workout, without directly modulating androgenic hormones which lead to the production of DHT and hair loss.

I am a former boxer and am fighting again towards the end of the year. I’ve never taken any bodybuilding supplements before, but as I’m moving up in weight, will need to.
Is it right to think this is counterproductive to what the book might say about hair loss, as you’re introducing more testosterone into the equation?

I’m going to have to take supplements (no steroids though). I’m talking protein shakes, and nitric oxide in particular.

Answer

In actuality, your situation is perfect for the program outlined in the book. Protein and nitric oxide supplements are non-androgenic in nature, and nitric oxide is actually an excellent synergist to the two stacks outlined in the book, as it is a major component of hair and shown to improve hair regrowth (see http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01347957 for a clinical study on the subject).

As to testosterone, in short, long term training (the kind you are doing) is a good thing, whereas short spikes from otherwise completely sedentary activity are bad (tending to spike DHT and hormones involved in the hair loss process).  Refer to Chapter 5: Exercise Secrets, and the subsection, “Androgenic Impact of Exercise” for a full rundown of how to best optimize your workout for hair regrowth.

For more on how exercise impacts hair loss, including answers to the right and wrong ways to structure your exercise routines, refer to the Ultimate Hair Secrets eBook, which breaks down the results of eleven controlled clinical studies, combined them into outlines for ideal routines for keeping fit while maintaining proper hormone levels for hair regrowth, and covers the complete ins and outs of troubleshooting your current workout routine for ultimately minimizing production of follicle-binding DHT, which damages hair follicles and causes hair loss.

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